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Table of Contents


Quotes About:

Art & Music
Dishonesty & Wickedness
Habits & Greatness
Humor & Wit
Life
Love
Morality & Ethics
Politics
(Anti) Religion
Skepticism
Sympathy & Pity
True Philosopher & Free Spirit
Truth & Knowledge
Virtue & Character
Women
Related Material
Comments


Inspirational Quotes by Friedrich Nietzsche

Born: 15 Oct 1844

Died: 25 Aug 1900 (55)

Occupation: Philosopher

Nationality: German

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Friedrich Nietzsche

“I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse those who accuse. Looking away shall be my only negation. And all in all and on the whole: some day I wish to be only a Yes-sayer.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science  


“My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendacity in the face of what is necessary—but love it.

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Ecce Homo

Quotes about Art & Music

Quotes by Friedrich Nietzsche about Art & Music

“By means of music the very passions, enjoy themselves.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“In intercourse with scholars and artists one readily makes mistakes of opposite kinds: in a remarkable scholar one not infrequently finds a mediocre man; and often, even in a mediocre artist, one finds a very remarkable man.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Artists have here perhaps a finer intuition; they who know only too well that precisely when they no longer do anything “arbitrarily,” and everything of necessity, their feeling of freedom, of subtlety, of power, of creatively fixing, disposing, and shaping, reaches its climax–in short, that necessity and “freedom of will” are then the same thing with them. There is, in fine, a gradation of rank in psychical states, to which the gradation of rank in the problems corresponds; and the highest problems repel ruthlessly every one who ventures too near them, without being predestined for their solution by the loftiness and power of his spirituality. Of what use is it for nimble, everyday intellects, or clumsy, honest mechanics and empiricists to press, in their plebeian ambition, close to such problems, and as it were into this “holy of holies”–as so often happens nowadays! But coarse feet must never tread upon such carpets: this is provided for in the primary law of things; the doors remain closed to those intruders, though they may dash and break their heads thereon.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“All that the world needs most today, is combined in the most deductive manner in his art; the three great stimulants of exhausted people: brutality, artificiality, and innocence (idiocy).”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, The Case of Wagner


“And this is the definition of passion. Passion, also known as the acrobatic feats of ugliness on the tightrope of enharmonic. My friends, let us dare to be ugly! Wagner dated it! Let us heave the mud of the most repulsive harmonies undauntedly before us. We must not even spare our hands! Only thus, shall we become natural.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, The Case of Wagner


“We are lost if people once again think of music hedonistically.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, The Case of Wagner


“And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music”

– Friedrich Nietzsche

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Quotes about Dishonesty and Wickedness

Quotes by Friedrich Nietzsche about Dishonesty & Wickedness

“There is a haughtiness of kindness which has the appearance of wickedness.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“They imagine that they are selfless in it because they appear to be seeking the advantage of another creature often to their own disadvantage. But in return they want to possess the other creature.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“When we have to change an opinion about any one we charge heavily to his account the inconvenience he thereby causes us.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“I am affected, not because you have deceived me, but because I can no longer believe in you.” – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“To talk much about oneself may also be a means of concealing oneself.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“In the writings of a recluse one always hears something of the echo of the wilderness, something of the murmuring tones and timid vigilance of solitude; in his strongest words, even in his cry itself, there sounds a new and more dangerous kind of silence, of concealment.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The man of modern ideas, the conceited ape, is excessively dissatisfied with himself – this is perfectly certain. He suffers, and his vanity wants him only to suffer with his fellows.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The very decided Yea and Nay of their palate, their promptly ready disgust, their hesitating reluctance with regard to everything strange, their horror of the bad taste even of lively curiosity, and in general the averseness of every distinguished and self-sufficing culture to avow a new desire, a dissatisfaction with its own condition, or an admiration of what is strange: all this determines and disposes them unfavourably even towards the best things of the world which are not their property or could not become their prey–and no faculty is more unintelligible to such men than just this historical sense, with its truckling, plebeian curiosity.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“That which constitutes the painful delight of tragedy is cruelty; that which operates agreeably in so-called tragic sympathy, and at the basis even of everything sublime, up to the highest and most delicate thrills of metaphysics, obtains its sweetness solely from the intermingled ingredient of cruelty. What the Roman enjoys in the arena, the Christian in the ecstasies of the cross, the Spaniard at the sight of the faggot and stake, or of the bull-fight, the present-day Japanese who presses his way to the tragedy, the workman of the Parisian suburbs who has a homesickness for bloody revolutions, the Wagnerienne who, with unhinged will, “undergoes” the performance of “Tristan and Isolde”–what all these enjoy, and strive with mysterious ardour to drink in, is the philtre of the great Circe “cruelty.” Here, to be sure, we must put aside entirely the blundering psychology of former times, which could only teach with regard to cruelty that it originated at the sight of the suffering of OTHERS: there is an abundant, super-abundant enjoyment even in one’s own suffering, in causing one’s own suffering–and wherever man has allowed himself to be persuaded to self-denial in the RELIGIOUS sense, or to self-mutilation, as among the Phoenicians and ascetics, or in general, to desensualisation, decarnalisation, and contrition, to Puritanical repentance-spasms, to vivisection of conscience and to Pascal- like SACRIFIZIA DELL’ INTELLETO, he is secretly allured and impelled forwards by his cruelty, by the dangerous thrill of cruelty TOWARDS HIMSELF.–Finally, let us consider that even the seeker of knowledge operates as an artist and glorifier of cruelty, in that he compels his spirit to perceive AGAINST its own inclination, and often enough against the wishes of his heart:–he forces it to say Nay, where he would like to affirm, love, and adore; indeed, every instance of taking a thing profoundly and fundamentally, is a violation, an intentional injuring of the fundamental will of the spirit, which instinctively aims at appearance and superficiality,–even in every desire for knowledge there is a drop of cruelty.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“A man is an actor when he is ahead of mankind in his possession of this one view, that everything which has to strike people as true, must not be true.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, The Case of Wagner

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Habits & Greatness

Inspirational Quotes by Nietzsche about Habits & Greatness

“All that is good is easy; everything divine runs away with light feet. Everything that is good makes me productive.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Nothing so easily makes a painful impression as when a great mind despoils itself of its wings and strives virtuously in something greatly inferior, while it renounces more lofty aims.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“When instinct is weakened, what ought to be eschewed now attracts. People actually kiss that which plunges them more quickly into the abyss.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The definition of a vegetarian: a creature who has need of a corroborating diet. To recognize what is harmful as harmful, to be able to deny oneself what is harmful, is a sign of youth, of vitality. That which is harmful lures the exhausted: cabbage lures the vegetarian. Illness itself can be a stimulus to life but one must be healthy for such a stimulus!”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Every essential to the beginning of the work was ready: and the most essential, it cannot be said too often, are methods, and also the most difficult to develop, and the longest opposed by habit and laziness.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“It is not the strength, but the duration, of great sentiments that makes great men.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“He who attains his ideal, precisely thereby surpasses it.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“There is an innocence of admiration: it is possessed by him to whom it has not yet occurred that he himself may be admired someday.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The fact thereby becomes obvious that the greater part of what interests and charms higher natures, and more refined and fastidious tastes, seems absolutely uninteresting to the average man.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Humor & Wit


“The belly is the reason why man does not so readily take himself for a god.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One does not believe in the follies of clever men: what a forfeiture of the rights of man!”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Perhaps though nothing else of the present has a future, our laughter itself may have a future!”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes About Life

Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Life

“One has regarded life carelessly, if one has failed to see the hand that kills with leniency.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Under peaceful conditions the militant man attacks himself.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One begins to distrust very clever persons when they become embarrassed.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Heavy melancholy men turn lighter, and come temporarily to their surface, precisely by that which makes others heavy- by hatred and love.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The maturity of man, that means, to have reacquired the seriousness that one had as a child at play.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“We all feign to ourselves that we are simpler than we are; we thus relax ourselves away from our fellows.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“A discerning one might easily regard himself as the animalization of god.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The great epochs of our life are at points when we gain courage to rebaptize our badness as the best in us.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Our loathing of dirt may be so great to prevent our cleaning ourselves. Justifying ourselves.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Sensuality often forces the growth of love too much, so that its roots remain weak, and is easily torn up.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“To rejoice on account of praise is in many cases merely politeness of heart and the very opposite of vanity of spirit.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The one seeks an accoucheur for his thoughts, the other seeks someone whom he can assist: a good conversation thus originates.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The sense of tragic increases and declines with sensuousness.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Not only our reason, but also our conscience, trickles to our strongest impulse – the tyrant in us.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“In praise there is more obtrusiveness than in blame.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One does not hate as long as one disesteems, but only when one esteems equal or superior.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The consequences of our actions seize us by the forelock, very indifferent to the fact that we have meanwhile reformed.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes About Love


“A soul which knows that it is loved, but does not love itself, betrays its sediment: its dregs come up.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Love brings to light the noble and hidden qualities of a lover. His rare and exceptional traits: it is thus liable to be deceptive as to his normal character.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“To vigorous men intimacy is a matter of shame and something precious.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One loves ultimately one’s desires, not the thing desired.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Morality & Ethics


“You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“There is no such thing as moral phenomena, but only a moral interpretation of phenomena.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The criminal is often enough not equal to his deed: he extenuates and maligns it.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The advocates of a criminal are seldom artists enough to turn the beautiful terribleness of the deed to the advantage of the doer.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Our vanity would like what we do best to pass precisely for what is most difficult to us. – concerning the origin of many systems of morals.” – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“That which an age considers evil is usually an unseasonable echo of what was formerly considered good – the atavism of an old ideal.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One must repay good and ill; but why just to the person who did us good or ill?”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Ye utilitarians- ye too love the Utile only as a vehicle for your inclinations — ye too really find the noise of its wheels insupportable.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The vanity of others is only counter to our taste when it is counter to our vanity.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Morality as attitude is opposed to our taste nowadays.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The practice of judging and condemning morally, is the favorite revenge if the intellectually shallow on those who are less so, it is also a kind of indemnity for their being badly endowed by nature, and finally it is an opportunity for acquiring spirit and becoming subtle.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes About Politics

Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Politics

“A nation is a detour of nature to arrive at six or seven great men. Yes, and then to get around them.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Insanity in individuals is something rare, but in groups, parties, nations and epochs it is the rule.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Our fellow creature is not our neighbor, but our neighbor’s neighbor: so thinks every nation.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“They all have something in common: they keep their ears closed in the presence of the delirious folly and noisy spouting of the democratic bourgeois.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Religion (Anti-Religion)

Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Religion

 

“The man of faith the believer of any sort is necessarily a dependent man, such a man cannot posit himself as a goal, nor can he find goals within himself. The believer does not belong to himself, he can only be a means to an end, he must be used up, and he needs someone to use up. His instinct gives the highest honors to an ethic of self-effacement; he is promoted to embrace it by everything: his prudence, his experience, his vanity. Every sort of faith is in itself an evidence of self-effacement, of self-estrangement.”

-Friedrich Nietzsche


“But the grandiose attitudes of these sick intellects, these intellectual epileptics are of influence upon the great masses. Fanatics are picturesque, and mankind prefers observing poses to listening to reasons.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“The last analysis it comes to this: the poisoning, the calumniation, the denial of life, the despising of the body, the degradation and self-contamination of man by the concept of sin, therefor, its means are also bad.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“The sneakiness of hypocrisy, the secrecy of the conventicle, concepts as black as hell, such as the sacrifice of the innocent.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“He combatted the subterranean cults, the whole of latent Christianity – to deny immortality was already a form of genuine salvation.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“Nihilist and Christian: they rhyme in German and they do more than rhyme”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“Christianity destroyed for us the whole harvest of ancient civilization, and later it also destroyed for us the whole harvest of Mohammedan civilization. The wonderful culture of the Moors in Spain, which was to us and appealed more to our senses and, tastes than that of Rome and Greece, was trampled down.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“A religious man thinks only for himself.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“The Christian church has left nothing untouched by its depravity; it has turned every value into worthlessness, and every truth into a lie, and every integrity into a baseness of soul. Let anyone dare speak to me of its humanitarian blessings! Its deepest necessities range it against any effort to abolish distress; it lives by distress; it creates distress to make itself immortal.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“Everything that is profound loves the mask: the profoundest things have a hatred even of figure and likeness.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Books for the general reader are always ill-smelling books; the odor of paltry people clings to them. Where the populace eat and drink, and even where they reverence, it is accustomed to stink. One should not go into churches if one wishes to breathe PURE air.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Not their love of humanity, but the impotence of their love, prevents the Christians of today – burning us.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“To him who feels himself preordained to contemplation and not to belief, all believers are too noisy and obtrusive; he guards against them.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“It is a curious thing that god learned Greek when he wished to turn author and that he did not learn it better.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The devil has the most extensive perspectives for god; on that account he keeps so far away from him: the devil, in effect, is the oldest friend of knowledge.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Christianity gave Eros poison to drink; he did not die of it, certainly, but degenerated to vice.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“It is the music in our conscience, the dance in our spirit, to which Puritan litanies, moral sermons, and goody goodness won’t chime.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Skepticism


“The strength, the freedom, which proceeds from intellectual power, from a superabundance of intellectual power, manifest themselves as skepticism.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“Men of fixed convictions do not count when it comes to determining what is fundamental in values and lack values. Men of convictions are prisoners. They do not see far enough, they do not see what is below them: whereas a man who would talk to any purpose about value and non-value must be able to see five hundred convictions beneath him and behind him. A mind that aspires to great things, and that wills the means thereto is necessary skeptical. Freedom from any sort of conviction belongs to strength and to an independent view.”

-Friedrich Nietzsche


“Objection, evasion, joyous distrust, and love of irony are signs of health; everything absolute belongs to pathology.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

 

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Sympathy & Pity


“Pity has an almost ludicrous effect on a man of knowledge, like tender hands on a Cyclops.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Sympathy for all would be harshness and tyranny for thee, my good neighbor.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One occasionally embraces someone or other, out of love to mankind (because one cannot embrace all); but this is what one must never confess to the individual.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Quotes About the True Philosopher & Free Spirit

Quotes by Nietzsche about Philosophy and free spirtis

 

“But the genuine philosopher — as it seems to us my friend? — lives “unphilosophically” and “unwisely”, above all imprudently, and feels the burden and the duty of a hundred attempts and temptations of life; he risks himself constantly, he plays the wicked game.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good & Evil 


“A philosopher: that is a man who constantly experiences, sees, hears, suspects, hopes, and dreams extraordinary things; who is struck by his own thoughts as if they came from the outside, from above and below, as a species of events and lightning flashes peculiar to him; who is perhaps himself a storm pregnant with new lightning; a portentous man, around whom there is always rumbling and mumbling and gaping and something uncanny going on. A philosopher: alas, a being afraid of himself- but whose curiosity always makes him come to himself again.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Fettered heart, free spirit. When one firmly fetters ones heart and keeps it prisoner, one can allow ones spirit many liberties: I said this once before but people do not believe what I say so, unless they know it already.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


Every deep thinker is more afraid of being understood than of being misunderstood. The later perhaps wounds his vanity, his sympathy, which always says: Ah, why would you also have as hard a time of it as I have?

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“THE OLYMPIAN VICE.–Despite the philosopher who, as a genuine Englishman, tried to bring laughter into bad repute in all thinking minds–“Laughing is a bad infirmity of human nature, which every thinking mind will strive to overcome” (Hobbes),–I would even allow myself to rank philosophers according to the quality of their laughing–up to those who are capable of GOLDEN laughter. And supposing that Gods also philosophize, which I am strongly inclined to believe, owing to many reasons–I have no doubt that they also know how to laugh thereby in an overman-like and new fashion–and at the expense of all serious things! Gods are fond of ridicule: it seems that they cannot refrain from laughter even in holy matters.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The philosopher must be the evil conscience of his age, but to this end he must be possessed of its best knowledge.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“It may be necessary for the education of the real philosopher that he himself should have once stood upon all those steps upon which his servants, the scientific workers of philosophy, remain standing, and MUST remain standing he himself must perhaps have been critic, and dogmatist, and historian, and besides, poet, and collector, and traveler, and riddle-reader, and moralist, and seer, and “free spirit,” and almost everything, in order to traverse the whole range of human values and estimations, and that he may BE ABLE with a variety of eyes and consciences to look from a height to any distance, from a depth up to any height, from a nook into any expanse. But all these are only preliminary conditions for his task; this task itself demands something else–it requires him TO CREATE VALUES.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“It is always more obvious to me that the philosopher  as a man indispensable for the morrow and the day after the morrow  has ever found himself  and has been obliged to find himself  in contradiction to the day in which he lives; the enemy has always been the ideal of his day.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Hitherto all those extraordinary furtherer’s of humanity whom one calls philosophers, who rarely regarded themselves as lovers of wisdom, but rather as disagreeable fools and dangerous interrogators, have found their mission, their hard, involuntary, imperative mission in being the bad conscience of their age.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“In putting the vivisections knife to the breast of the very virtues of their age, they have betrayed their own secret; it has been for the sake of a new greatness of man, a new untrodden path to his aggrandizement. They have always disclosed how much hypocrisy  indolence  self-indulgence  and self-neglect  how much falsehood was concealed under the most venerated types of contemporary morality  how much virtue was outlived  they have always said we must remove hence to where you are least at home.  in the face of a world of modern ideas which would like to confine everyone in a corner, in a specialty, a philosopher nowadays, would be compelled to place the greatness of man, the conception of greatness, precisely in his comprehensiveness and multifariousness, in his all-roundedness, he would determine worth and rank according to the amount and variety of which a man could bear and take upon himself, according to the extent to which a man could stretch his responsibility.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“At present it belongs to the conception of greatness to be noble  to wish to be apart  to be capable of being different  to stand alone  to have to live by personal initiative  and the philosopher will betray some of his own ideal when he asserts he shall be the greatest who can be most solitary  the most concealed  the most divergent  the man beyond good and evil  the master of his virtues  and of super-abundance of will; precisely this should be called greatness: as diversified as can be entire  as ample as can be full. And to ask once more the question: Is greatness possible nowadays?”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“It is difficult to learn what a philosopher is, because it cannot be taught: one must know it by experience. The fact that at present people talk of all things of which they cannot have any experience, is true more especially and unfortunately as concerns the philosopher and philosophical matters: the very few know them  are permitted to know them  and all popular ideas about them are false. Thus  for instance  the truly philosophical combination of a bold  exuberant personality which runs at a presto pace  and a dialectic rigor and necessity which makes no false step  is unknown to most thinkers and scholars from their own experience  and therefore  should any one speak of it in their presence  it is incredible to them.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


It is difficult to learn what a philosopher is, because it cannot be taught: one must “know” it by experience–or one should have the pride NOT to know it. The fact that at present people all talk of things of which they CANNOT have any experience, is true more especially and unfortunately as concerns the philosopher and philosophical matters:–the very few know them, are permitted to know them, and all popular ideas about them are false. Thus, for instance, the truly philosophical combination of a bold, exuberant spirituality which runs at presto pace, and a dialectic rigour and necessity which makes no false step, is unknown to most thinkers and scholars from their own experience, and therefore, should any one speak of it in their presence, it is incredible to them. They conceive of every necessity as troublesome, as a painful compulsory obedience and state of constraint; thinking itself is regarded by them as something slow and hesitating, almost as a trouble, and often enough as “worthy of the SWEAT of the noble”–but not at all as something easy and divine, closely related to dancing and exuberance! “To think” and to take a matter “seriously,” “arduously”–that is one and the same thing to them; such only has been their “experience.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Many generations must have prepared the way for the coming of the philosopher; each of his virtues must have been separately acquired, nurtured, transmitted, and embodied; not only the bold, easy, delicate course and current of his thoughts, but above all the readiness for great responsibilities, the majesty of ruling glance and contemning look, the feeling of separation from the multitude with their duties and virtues, the kindly patronage and defense of whatever is misunderstood and calumniated, be it God or devil, the delight and practice of supreme justice, the art of commanding, the amplitude of will, the lingering eye which rarely admires, rarely looks up, rarely loves. . . .”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“WE IMMORALISTS.–This world with which WE are concerned, in which we have to fear and love, this almost invisible, inaudible world of delicate command and delicate obedience, a world of “almost” in every respect, captious, insidious, sharp, and tender–yes, it is well protected from clumsy spectators and familiar curiosity! We are woven into a strong net and garment of duties, and CANNOT disengage ourselves–precisely here, we are “men of duty,” even we! Occasionally, it is true, we dance in our “chains” and betwixt our “swords”; it is none the less true that more often we gnash our teeth under the circumstances, and are impatient at the secret hardship of our lot. But do what we will, fools and appearances say of us: “These are men WITHOUT duty,”– we have always fools and appearances against us!”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Why did we choose it, this foolish task? Or, to put the question differently: “Why knowledge at all?” Every one will ask us about this. And thus pressed, we, who have asked ourselves the question a hundred times, have not found and cannot find any better answer. . .”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes about Truth & Knowledge


“Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“Our deepest thoughts must and should appear as follies, and under certain circumstances as crimes, when they come unauthorized to the ears of those who are not disposed and predestined for them.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“It is terrible to die of thirst at sea. Is it necessary that you should so salt your truth that it will no longer – quench thirst?”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“From the senses originate all trustworthiness, all good conscience, and all evidence of truth.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One no longer loves ones knowledge sufficiently after one has communicated it.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

 


“The more abstract the truth you wish to teach, the more you must allure the senses to it.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One may indeed lie with the mouth; but with every accompanying grimace one nevertheless tells the truth.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“In regards to what truthfulness is, perhaps nobody has ever been sufficiently truthful.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“But this is a realm of questions and answers in which a more fastidious spirit does not like to stay: for here truth has to stifle her yawns so much when she is obliged to answer. And after all, truth is a woman; one must not use force with her.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Quotes about Virtue & Character

Quotes by Nietzsche about Virtue & Character

“He, who cannot find the way to his ideal, lives more frivolously and shamelessly than the man without an ideal.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“One may rest assured that the greater the degree of a man’s intellectual conscience, the greater will be his modesty, his discretion, on this point. To know in five cases, and to refuse, with delicacy, to know anything further.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“The code of Manu differs from the bible. By means of it the nobles, the philosophers, and the warriors keep the whip hand over the majority. It is full of noble valuations; it shows a feeling of perfection, an acceptance of life, and triumphant feeling toward self and life.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche


“Our vanity is most difficult to wound just when our pride has been wounded.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Many a peacock hides his tail from every eye and calls it his pride.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“A man of genius is unbearable unless he possess at least two things besides: gratitude and purity.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The degree and nature of a man’s sensuality extends to the highest altitudes of his spirit.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Dreadful experiences raise the question whether he who experiences them, is not something dreadful also.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“A sign of strong character, when once the resolution has been taken, to shut the ear even to the best counterarguments. Occasionally, therefor, a will to stupidity.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The will to overcome an emotion, is ultimately only the will of another, or of several other, emotions.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“What a person is begins to betray itself when his talent decreases, when he ceased to show what he can do. Talent is also an adornment; an adornment is also concealment.”  – Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

“One is punished for ones virtues.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Wisdom: that seems to the populace to be a kind of flight, a means and artifice for withdrawing successfully from a bad game; but the genuine philosopher – does it not seem to us my friends? Lives unphilosophically and unwisely, above all imprudently, and feels the obligation and burden of a hundred attempts and temptations of life – he risks himself constantly, he plays this bad game.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The noble soul has reverence for itself”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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Quotes about Women & Relationships


 

“A woman learns to hate in proportion as she forgets how to charm.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The same emotions are in man and women, but in different temp, on that account man and woman never cease to misunderstand each other.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The immense expectation with regard to sexual love, and the coyness in this expectation, spoils all the perspectives of women at the outset.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“Where there is neither love nor hatred in the game, woman’s play is mediocre.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“The sexes deceive themselves about each other: the reason is that in reality they honor and love only themselves (or their own ideal, to express it more agreeably). Thus man wishes woman to be peaceable: but in fact woman is essentially unpeaceable, like the cat, however well she may have assumed the peaceable demeanor.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“We do the same when awake as when dreaming: we only invent and imagine him/her whom we have intercourse and forget it immediately.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“In revenge and in love woman is far more barbarous than man.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


“To seduce their neighbor to a favorable opinion, and afterwards to believe in implicitly in this opinion of their neighbor – who can do this trick as well as women?”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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